Service Design in Heritage Day 2

Friday was the final day of the Service Design in Heritage workshops hosted by the Life Rewired Hub at the Barbican.

We once again started off with the ideation session but this time during the mapping data workshop, we were able to try creating a hypothesised user journey and associating touchpoints with different parts of the organisation. It was a really interesting contrast with yesterday’s mapping data workshop where we focussed on taking a deep dive into the structure and associated data. Personally I think it shows the difference that the nature of the ‘How might we…?’ challenge makes. Even though many of the challenges had similarities in concern, the nuances that were added through the ideation process can result in quite significant differences to the nature of the project (something that is totally the norm from a complex systems perspective!)

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Service Design in Heritage day 1

See, I’m getting better at this insta-documenting lark!

Today was the first iteration of Service Design in [Arts, Culture &] Heritage workshop(s), held at the Barbican Arts Centre in the Life Rewired Hub. Borne out of some great conversations with Kristen Alfaro about common difficulties with designing holistic, inclusive services when working in a Cultural institution – be it a museum, an art gallery/space etc – the goal is to introduce some service design techniques and approaches and providing a space for participants to learn by doing.

Thanks to lessons learned from previous workshops e.g. at Wild Conference, this was split into two workshops, partly to give people more options but also because even doing half a design jam is still quite intense!

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Session 1 focussed on collaborative ideation techniques; session 2 on data/insights mapping and introduction to prototyping.

Much like the neo-mmanwu workshop, the structure was half a presentation type lecture sort of thing and half actually trying out the particular methods that would be used at that point of the design process.

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Wild conference workshop: The co-designed city

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This was a workshop hosted at the 2019 Wild Conference which had several goals:

  1. Spread awareness of service design methods to generate ideas and work collaboratively with the community, people from different areas of expertise and departments
  2. Raise questions about how smart cities are developed from a heritage and culture perspective
  3. Raise design questions to be focussed on in broader research regarding community led design practice for smart cities

Description

Part design jam, part hackathon, part improvised performance, this session is a space to explore and prototype the future city, a place where pervasive computing meets social justice; a built environment which puts inclusion and sustainability at the heart of its digital and physical architecture.

As increasingly complex digital and physical infrastructure are developed to support our needs, who gets a say in how they get designed and implemented? What happens when techno-optimism meets the realities of social inequalities? How can we work as designers, technologists, activists and organisers to continually advocate for the needs and perspectives of the people most likely to be ignored and what are the challenges we face in doing so? Following collaborative design practice as we ideate and prototype, test and iterate, the workshop will be an opportunity to learn techniques for generating and embedding community centred requirements, testing at scale and sharing skills with the people we might think we’re designing for.

Will we find a way to the co-designed city of the future? Join us and find out!

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Birmingham Design Festival: Even if we’re all doomed, can we try and design better?

This was a workshop hosted at the 2019 Birmingham Design Festival to:

  1. Spread awareness about using ethical frameworks to better understand the requirements needs of all actors working in a system to ensure ethical design practice
  2. Add to learnings about difficulties faced by designers to work in an ethical manner

Description

Designers are increasingly aware of practices such as inclusive and speculative design in response to the pressing concerns or our time such as systemic oppression, algorithmic injustice, environmental impact and how designers can better acknowledge our role, whether in perpetuating or addressing these issues.

However, it might be easy to talk about radical shifts in practice, but what does all this stuff mean in the day-to-day? Whether a designer-of-one or part of an established consultancy, it can still feel we are barely touching the surface of the platforms we’re designing for and are still under siege from competing business priorities, yet alone be able to meet the demands of ethical and sustainable design practice.

Part design jam, part collaborative learning session, this workshop aimed at designers of all levels, will take you through the steps to create an inclusive design ethics framework and provide a space where we can link up and organise our respective collectives (and selves!) to support each other and take action towards a holistically ethical design practice within our individual contexts.

Original link for reference

 

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Black Futures Conference: Reconfiguring community led smart city design through the Black Quantum Futurist framework

I was really honoured to be part of the Black Futures conference held on 31st May 2019. Here is a link to the video. A transcript of the talk is available below.

Description

As the infrastructure for the smart city of the future is being laid, is it possible to combine insights from community led and indigenous design approaches to counter the examples of historic and contemporary architectural racism and thus provide a strategy for survival in massively connected networks?

Created by Camae Ayewa and Rasheedah Phillips, the Black Quantum Futurist (BQF) framework provides a means to collapse linear time, bringing futurities to the present through communally generated artefacts. In this talk, we will explore how using the BQF framework to incorporate communally generated environmental memory and requirements-space into the design process can be a method for generating equitable and robust futurities of the built environment.

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Service Design Fringe Festival 2018: Creating a Framework for Ethical Design practice

 

This was a workshop hosted at the 2018 Service Design Fringe Festival to

  1. Spread awareness about using ethical frameworks to better understand the requirements needs of all actors working in a system to ensure ethical design practice
  2. Add to learnings about difficulties faced by designers to work in an ethical manner

Description

With a wide array of platforms and connected services, varying user needs and business priorities, how can we navigate tech innovation, business requirements and user needs to create services of value that are solution focussed yet sustainable and don’t compromise security, user data or ethics?

This workshop will be set up as a design jam where we will explore the common pain points and barriers to inclusive and ethical design we might experience in our day-to-day jobs, ultimately creating a prototype framework for ethical design practice that can be adapted for (almost!) any project.

 

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